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Stir it up magazine October 2014

BAUMANN’S BLOG 42 OCTOBER 2014 >> To coincide with the game season and this issue’s Melting Pot feature on curry, I thought I’d share my recipe for game curry with you. It makes a nice change to use game instead of chicken or lamb – I find it’s much more flavoursome and it carries the curry flavour really well. It goes down a treat with our customers at the brasserie! JB’s Game Curry >> Makes 4 portions >> Cooking time 1/20 minutes Ingredients Joh n ‘B o y’ R a n f i e l d 500g game mix – I used a mix of guineafowl, wood pigeon, Venison and rabbit, with a small helping of zebra, just ask your butcher for a selection 2 sticks lemongrass, finely chopped 1 ‘thumb’ of root ginger, peeled and finely chopped 2 red and 2 green chillies, finely chopped 6 cloves of garlic, smashed 2 spuds, peeled and cubed 1 large Spanish onion, sliced 4 plum tomatoes Coriander root chopped 1 butternut squash, peeled and cubed 50 ml vegetable oil/ghee 250ml water 500ml natural yoghurt 25g chicken bouillon paste (Country Range) Spices 6 tbsp Country Range mixed medium curry powder OR 1 tbsp turmeric 1 tbsp ground ginger 1 tbsp cumin seeds 1 tbsp coriander seeds 1 tbsp green cardamom pods 1 tbsp chilli powder 1 cinnamon stick 1 tbsp white ground pepper “It makes a nice change to use game instead of chicken or lamb – I find it’s much more flavoursome and it carries the curry flavour really well.” Teaching chefs of the future By Brian Young, director general of British Frozen Food Federation British Frozen Food Federation is assisting secondary schools by launching an initiative to provide education packs on cooking with frozen food. The aim of the education packs is to teach pupils about the nutritional, financial and waste reduction benefits provided by frozen food. The packs have been made available to food technology teachers to act as aids during lessons for pupils in Key Stage 3, or Year 9. Pupils at Key Stage 3 are aged between 13 and 14; we have identified this as a key age group for providing pupils with the key facts about frozen food. This age group is a time where teenagers – who may eventually choose a route working in a kitchen professionally - begin learning about food and cooking skills as part of the curriculum. The education packs fit into the school syllabus by providing two lesson plans, with materials to assist food technology teachers. The first lesson plan includes group activities and includes information about valuable qualities of frozen food. The second lesson plan is a practical session that gives pupils the opportunity to use the valuable knowledge they have learnt by cooking a dish of their choice using frozen ingredients. I believe these packs will provide a superb tool for food technology teachers, particularly with the plans, activities and materials fitting with the syllabus. The facts and stats will go some way in helping to debunk the myth that fresh is superior to frozen. For more information visit: bfff.co.uk Baumann’s blog )) By Baumann’s Brasserie head chef John ‘Boy’ Ranfield JB’s game curry goes down really well with the customers Method • Firstly I browned the entire game mix off, seasoned with salt and pepper in a hot pan, once browned (but not cooked) take off the heat and leave to the side. • Using the same pan, heat all the spices to ‘sweat’ the flavour out of them and make them come alive. • While the spices are sweating away, heat some oil up in a large saucepan and add the lemongrass, garlic, ginger, onion and tomatoes and cook till soft. • Add the spices and meat to the onion mix and stir well. • Now add the potatoes and butternut squash, water and chicken stock. • Simmer on a medium heat for 40 minutes or till the meat is just tender but not mushy! • Add the natural yoghurt, coriander root and season. • Serve your game curry with traditional basmati rice and naan bread, or perhaps some game chips and a bowl of autumn veg. Happy cooking!


Stir it up magazine October 2014
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