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Stir it up magazine May 2014

SPECIAL FEATURE H ALLY E se, m, oca, ago, r, MAY 2014 37 GO GLUTEN-FREE Putting the spotlight on coeliac disease >> Coeliac disease comes under the spotlight this month with an awareness week (May 12-18) aimed at highlighting the diffi culties sufferers face. The disease affects one in 100 people, and while this may not sound like a lot, research shows that people with the condition and the family and friends they eat out with are worth a potential £100million. Eating away from home – where they are no longer in control – is perhaps the biggest challenge facing people with coeliac disease. The choice over where to eat is made by the person with the condition and so it is worth caterers making the effort to secure their loyal custom. Some organisations and individual chefs are doing great things for people on a gluten-free diet by ensuring that they get the same quality of service as other customers. However, there still remains a huge opportunity for this market to grow, much like it has done in the retail Free From sector. Kathryn Miller, food policy lead for Coeliac UK, explains: “Coeliac disease is a long term autoimmune condition caused by intolerance to gluten. Gluten is a protein found in the cereals wheat, barley and rye. Wheat is used as the basis of staple foods such as bread and pasta and is also found in processed foods such as sausages, sauces, gravy powders and stock cubes. “There is a law on the use of the termgluten-free which means it can only be used in association with foods that contain 20 parts permillion or less. Coeliac UK has carried out research with caterers in commercial kitchens since the law was introduced which demonstrates that even in busy commercial kitchens, it is possible to prepare gluten-free options. “It may be possible to produce gluten-free meals with only minimal changes to menus. Some dishes you are serving may already be gluten-free or ingredients may be adjusted to make the dishes suitable on a glutenfree diet. For example, using corn fl our instead of wheat fl our to thicken a sauce, or swapping glutencontaining stock powder for a gluten-free version.” Key areas you need to tackle to ensure that you and the rest of your catering team are getting it right: • Choosing and using the right ingredients –make sure you know what is in the ingredients you use • Storage of ingredients and fi nished dishes • Preparing and cooking gluten-free food – it is important to look at the processes in the kitchen – are there a few changes you can make to be able to prepare gluten-free meals • Serving gluten-free meals – use separate tongs /serving spoons for gluten-free foods • Cleaning and personal hygiene – good hygiene is key to good gluten management • Communication to kitchen staffffffffffff and customers – make sure your staff know about gluten-free and can communicate which options are gluten -free to customers • Labelling your menu – if you are providing gluten-free meals, tell your customers! Eating out is a top concern for people on a gluten-free diet, so seeing gluten-free on themenu is a great help. FOODS WHICH ARE NATURALLY GLUTEN-FREE • fruit, vegetables, nuts, seeds, pulses • meat, poultry, fi sh • eggs, soya, milk, cheese, natural yogurts, cream, cottage cheese • rice, corn (maize),tapioca,polenta, buckwheat,sago, arrowroot, cornfl gram fl our, potato our, soya fl our, teff, quinoa • butter, margarine cooking oils. FOODS TO AVOID • Gluten can be present in food knowingly as an ingredient or accidentally by coming into contact with gluten-containing ingredients, such as wheat fl our or breadcrumbs, used in the same premises. • Some people with coeliac disease also need to avoid oats. Most oats commonly found in shops are not suitable for use in a gluten-free diet as they are contaminated with wheat or barley. • The main sources of gluten are foods such as wheat fl our, bread and rolls, pizza, pastry, pasta, crackers, biscuits and cakes. • Other foods and drinks that also contain gluten are beer, lager and stout, soy sauce, sausages, some breakfast cereals, ready meals, ready-made gravies and sauces. 10% DISCOUNT FROM COELIAC UK FOR STIR IT UP READERS Coeliac UK offers practical information to help caterers provide safe gluten-free meals, and also provide advice on the relevant food legislation and is offering Stir it up readers a special 10% discount (usually priced at £35+VAT) on online training until 31 August 2014. Use discount code STIRITUP2014 when buying an online course from www.coeliacuktraining.org.uk For more information contact Cateringtraining@ coeliac.org.uk / 01494 796727 www.coeliac.org.uk/courses However, there still remains a huge opportunity for this market to grow, much like it has done in the retail Free From sector. HICH RA REE h chees cream , tapio eat, sa our, o fl our uinoa and AV sent i redie ming in -cont s whe bs,use . coelia ats. M shops gluten taminated y. VOID n food nt or nto aining at ed ac s n-t d Y


Stir it up magazine May 2014
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