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Stir it up magazine March 2015

HOSPITALITY “...kids clearly have a very important voice in the dining out market too.” Pester Po wer! Pester power drives 763million family eat-out visits per year in Britain
 FOODSERVICE INTELLIGENCE FROM “Pester power actually plays a huge role in where families choose to eat out,” said Jack MacIntyre, NPD Group account manager foodservice UK. “This may be surprising to some, as pester power is often associated with more obviously child-focused sectors such as toys or confectionery, but kids clearly have a very important voice in the dining out market too. “Parents and kids find it especially attractive when they see kids’ menus that are properly thought through, rather than simply offering smaller portions of the adult menu, and when there is an attractive family meal deal on offer too. “Kids enjoy the stimulating and lively atmosphere of the play areas, different types of seating, board games, music and televisions provided by many branded pubs. It’s paying off in terms of kids telling their parents that’s where they want to eat out.” Putting the back in F00dservice! /TyphooTea @Typhoo_Tea www.TyphooTea.com C M Y CM MY CY CMY K When a family chooses to eat out in a British restaurant, fast food outlet or even in a pub or curry house, it’s the kids that dictate the decision of where to dine in one in four visits. Foodservice industry figures from global information provider The NPD Group show ‘because my kids like it there’ is one of the main reasons for consumers picking their chosen eating out venue in 24% of family visits. With families making 3.18billion eat-out visits in the year ending October 2014, this is equivalent to over 763million ‘let-the-kidschoose’ visits worth £4billion each year. Branded pub chains appeal most to kids (30% of family visits picked by kids), followed by the well-established fast-food outlets (29%), and the family-friendly casual dining outlets (28%). Flexitarianism – what is it? >> Allegra Foodservice’s report on Menu and Food Trends highlighted the trend of Flexitarianism, which raises the question, ‘What does that mean?’ Allegra has highlighted growth in plant- based foods for some time, as consumers move through the protein spectrum, from red to white meat and into plant based. Reasons vary from health and sustainability, to flavour and taste, or simply for a social aspect as we have seen with ‘Veganuary’. Another factor has been the rise of Soya drinks as a dairy replacement, especially in hot beverages. Consumers are more open-minded to eating different cuisines; as a result Mediterranean, Middle Eastern, Persian or Lebanese foods have become more popular. A key staple of these diets is chickpea based Falafel, and consumers are appreciating this healthy and delicious dish. So, Flexitarianism is a summation of these trends; consumers seek interesting foods that are healthier and more sustainable, that deliver a good eating experience and provide great value. Those foods don’t need to be meat based; consumers are happy to not eat meat, not because they are vegetarian, but because they like the alternatives. The message to operators is not to put a separate or boxed off vegetarian section on a menu, which makes those consumers who don’t eat meat feel like outcasts! Embrace non-meat dishes and include them as a key part of the menu, so that Flexitarians can enjoy the whole menu, and value the overall experience more. Landscape Country Range Advert - Typhoo 07.01.2015.pdf 1 07/01/2015 14:20:00 MARCH 2015 19


Stir it up magazine March 2015
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