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Stir it up magazine SEPTEMBER 2017

“Recognisable food brand images will always get people talking: Birds Custard, C olma ns Mustard, Custard Creams and Marmite are all firm favourites wit h residents.” 73% 52% Had to buy food and drinks from vending machines SEPTEMBER 2017 19 HEALTH & WELFARE Two-thirds of British hospital visitors are left unable to buy proper meals Visitors to hospitals in Britain have been left hungry and disappointed when visiting loved ones outside of working hours. A survey, commissioned by Preoday, questioned people who have visited a hospital in the last five years and found 64% have been unable to buy themselves a proper meal because hospital cafés and restaurants have been closed during a visit. Wish cafés would remain open until visiting hours end In 2015/16, the NHS Confederation reported there were over 16million hospital admissions. With many patients receiving visitors during their stay, millions may have been left unable to find a much-needed meal during their visit. Matt Graywood, chief operating officer of Preoday, said: “With cafés and restaurants closing around 5pm, but visiting hours continuing until 8pm, there’s little opportunity to obtain a good evening meal. If outlets must close before the end of visiting hours, hospitals should take the opportunity to provide a convenient pre-ordering food service for collection, or even delivery, outside of hours. It’s a solution that would allow visitors to plan ahead and feel relaxed about finding a decent meal.” >> Themed dining rooms with interactive and nostalgic displays are helping to improve the wellbeing and diet of dementia sufferers in care homes. There are around 850,000 people with dementia in the UK and, in many cases, their long-term memory is still working so nostalgic items and smells offer reassurance and prompts for conversation. Gillian Hesketh, of Happy Days Dementia Workshop & Nostalgic Design, explains: “Having spent many hours discussing meal-time approaches with residential home managers, day centre providers, meal delivery services and frontline carers, the most talked about issue after nutrition, was the difficulty in encouraging people to eat. “Dementia can affect a person’s relationship to food, impacting on their eating habits, meal-times and food choices. Even finding their way to the dining room can become difficult for some people. We believe that prompting the long-term memory with images of food and everyday mealtimes can help; a freshly cut loaf may signify the smell of newly baked bread and prompt taste buds, preparing the person to eat. Taste, textures and conversational prompts around the subject of food, eating and food favourites can also help to encourage eating.” Gillian is passionate about nostalgic environments for prompting social activity and creating community interaction. In one Stockport care home, she has created a nostalgic sweet shop, complete with counter, sweet dispensers, scales, curiosities, original magazines, nostalgic games and, of course, sweets. Encouraging able people to integrate with daily activities is another way to promote the idea of meal-times and eating, such as laying or clearing the tables, folding napkins, or adding flowers. “The sweet shop is also a community space where residents, carers, family and visitors can reminisce and share and enjoy stories with their loved ones over a cup of tea,” Nostalgic dining rooms for dementia sufferers


Stir it up magazine SEPTEMBER 2017
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