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Stir it up magazine November December 2015

SPECIAL FEATURE >> It is vitally important that you highlight the dishes that are gluten-free on your menu and Coeliac UK recommends the following wording is used on its GF accredited menus: “We follow strict hygiene practices in our kitchens, but we are unable to guarantee dishes are free from all allergens. We advise you speak to a member of staff in our restaurants if you have any food allergies or intolerances. The GF symbol denotes a gluten-free dish as accredited by Coeliac UK. Processes and training are in place to ensure that meals on this menu are gluten-free. Gluten-free means foods that contain gluten at a level of no more than 20 parts per million (ppm).” The demo Phil Vickery has spent years experimenting and perfecting his gluten-free recipes. He first encountered the demand for gluten-free purely by chance when his Christmas pudding company was unable to buy flour at the right price and decided to use rice flour instead, which is gluten-free. He admits it was an incredibly frustrating process. “It goes against all the normal rules of cooking,” he says. “You really do have to think outside of the box. For example, I tried making gluten-free pastry but it was tasteless and had no colour. It just wasn’t working but eventually I realised that I had to look at it from a completely different – and unconventional – angle. “Gluten adds the stretchiness and holds the structure and, when you take it out there’s nothing there. I therefore use Xanthan gum, which mimics the structure of gluten. The pastry can be easily moulded and it is impossible to overwork it. You can make it up in batches and there’s no need to blind bake.” As well as the pastry, which was used to make a delicious asparagus quiche, Phil also demonstrated how to make gluten-free muffins and tortilla chips, and created a gluten-free alternative for coating meats for stews and casseroles. For full recipes, please visit www.knorrglutenfree.co.uk or YouTube: goo.gl/wLo3yi THE FACTS: What is coeliac disease? Coeliac disease (pronounced see-liac) is a serious lifelong autoimmune disease caused by intolerance to the protein gluten. What are the symptoms? Symptoms range from mild to severe and vary from person to person. Common symptoms include frequent bouts of diarrhoea, stomach pain and cramping, ongoing fatigue, regular mouth ulcers, lots of gas and bloating, and unexplained anaemia. Is there a cure? There is no cure for coeliac disease. The only treatment is lifelong adherence to a strict gluten-free diet. 40 NOV / DEC 2015 Attendees at the gluten-free workshop Simple switches Make your dishes gluten-free by simply substituting these ingredients: Out In Breadcrumbs >>> Polenta crumbs/cornflakes Couscous >>> Quinoa Wheat tortillas >>> Gluten-free corn tortillas Pasta >>> Rice Egg noodles >>> Vegetable ribbons Soy sauce >>> Tamari soy sauce What is gluten? Gluten is a protein naturally found in wheat, rye and barley. Obvious sources of gluten include breads, pasta and gravy. Is coeliac disease a food allergy? No it is an autoimmune disease that damages the lining of the small intestine, preventing the absorption of important nutrients. Food allergies usually occur with seconds or minutes of eating the food in question. Tiny amounts can cause potentially life-threatening allergic reactions. Food intolerance is not triggered by the immune system and is generally not life-threatening. It may affect digestion and common symptoms include digestive discomfort, diarrhoea and bloating. KNORR have produced a Gluten-free guide for professional catering. You can download this at: www.unileverfoodsolutions.co.uk/ menu-support/allergen-information.html


Stir it up magazine November December 2015
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