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Stir it up magazine November December 2015

COOKS CALENDAR 04 NOV / DEC 2015 Cooks calendar... November In season... red cabbage potatoes cauliflower Brussell sprouts 1 World Vegan Day 2-6 National School Meals Week www.thegreatschoollunch.co.uk 2-8 British Sausage Week www.lovepork.co.uk 6-8 Good Food Show Scotland, SECC, Glasgow www.bbcgoodfoodshowscotland.co.uk 6-8 Cake International, NEC Birmingham www.cakeinternational.co.uk 5 Bonfire Night 8 Remembrance Sunday sloes quinces 9-13 National Community Meals Week www.thenacc.co.uk/events/ community_meals_wheels_week 19-21 The Skills Show, NEC Birmingham www.theskillsshow.com 24 British Frozen Food Federation Annual Luncheon, Hilton on Park Lane, London 26-29 BBC Good Food Show Winter, NEC Birmingham www.bbcgoodfoodshowwinter.com 30 St Andrew’s Day (Scotland) Jerusalem artichokes parsnips January In season... carrots kale mackerel leeks Guinea fowl venison 1 New Year’s Day 24-26 Scotland’s Speciality Food Show, The SECC, Glasgow www.scotlandsspecialityfoodshow.com 25 Burns Night 16 World Food Day 24-30 National Farmhouse Breakfast Week www.shakeupyourwakeup.com December In season... beetroot guinea fowl turnips white cabbage 6 Craft Guild of Chefs Christmas Lunch, Chiswick Moran Hotel 24 Christmas Eve 25 Christmas Day 26 Boxing Day 31 New Year’s Eve By Dr Ron Kill, managing director of Micron2 and technical consultant to Country Range Christmas Buffets >> I was once staying at a well-known lodge-type hotel (you know what I mean) and going up to the buffet for my usual continental breakfast when the man in front of me sneezed over all the exposed foods. Understandably, I lost my appetite at that point. A problem all caterers face with buffets is the possibility of the customers contaminating the foods. Whether through handling products or serving equipment or through something air-borne (see above) the public are a real liability here. Equally it is important for the caterer to ensure that the conditions are right, basic rules of hygiene in preparation are followed, serving utensils and surfaces are kept hygienic and food is covered as much as possible. Sneeze guards are ideal. Serving temperatures for hot and cold food must also be monitored. Think about the time that food is on a buffet. The FSA advises that nothing should be left out for more than four hours. Also think about the journey that chilled food has, don’t leave it standing at room temperature. Space is also important, do not crowd different foods together on a buffet and increase the chances of cross-contamination. Educate the public by using signage asking them to observe good practice (use of serving tongs etc). The fact is that buffets account for a high proportion of cases of food borne illness. Christmas will soon be upon us so let us not spoil the festivities with some unwanted food safety issues.


Stir it up magazine November December 2015
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