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Stir it up magazine May 2017

Half of consumers won’t return to a pub that serves poor quality coffee New research by UCC Coffee UK & Ireland has highlighted a significant opportunity for pubs to increase trade through an improved coffee offer. With consumers rating the quality of coffee as average, the findings reinforce the demand for better coffee in non-specialist outlets. The survey by Allegra World Coffee Portal also reveals that 44% of consumers would be put off returning to a pub that serves poor quality coffee. Conversely 41% would buy more coffee more often in pubs if the quality was better. The report reaffirms that coffee is the on-trend drink of today with more than a third (33%) of consumers buying coffee out of home at least four times per week and almost two-thirds of consumers willing to pay £2.99 for a great cup of coffee. Phil Smith, head of category & insight, UCC Coffee UK & Ireland comments: “Lots of pub operators are doing coffee well but there’s still significant room for improvement across the market. “For pubs and bars keen to diversify, grow and retain their customer base, or to set themselves apart from the competition, high-quality coffee is the key. For pubs with a strong food offer, coffee quality significantly impacts on customer satisfaction. It’s an integral part of eating out, with three quarters of diners valuing coffee quality as an important part of the overall experience.” The chairman of the Asian Catering Federation (ACF) Yawar Khan predicts that half of the nation’s curry houses will disappear from the High Street inside a decade. Issues facing curry restaurant owners – such as chef shortages and rising costs – have been widely reported, but it is the failure of some restaurateurs to respond to changing customer demands and ignoring modern technology, that will spell the collapse of this once thriving sector, he claims. Despite two curry restaurants closing each week, the dining out sector as a whole is actually thriving, with sales and new openings on the increase. The Asian Catering Federation represents owners of over 35,000 ethnic restaurants and takeaways – including those in the Indian, Chinese, Thai and Malaysian community, but the largest single group are Bangladeshi. Over 90% of Britain’s ‘Indian’ curry restaurants are Bangladeshi owned. “We British Bangladeshis can be very insular and inward looking, we fail to regard other cuisines as competition and we are slow to adopt new marketing opportunities, such as social media platforms,” said Mr Khan. 28% of consumers state that, if it opened earlier, they would visit a pub or bar for their morning coffee, rather than a high-street coffee shop “For years we have been telling restaurants they need to up their game with shorter menus, offering lighter healthier options with more fish and vegetable dishes, with genuinely authentic regional food. Many rarely see a customer at lunch time, whilst pubs and chains like Nando’s are serving thousands of spicy dishes throughout the day.” Thomas Chan, who is chairman of the Chinese Takeaway Association, and Teddy Chen, chairman of the Malaysian Restaurant Association, report similar complacency among many of their own members. Mr Chen added: “It will be sad to lose some old favourites, but there are some exciting and dynamic restaurateurs waiting in the wings to take their place.” 63% of consumers believe that a high-quality cup of coffee at the end of a meal makes the difference between a good quality experience and a truly great one 31% often order coffee instead of a dessert when eating out 44% of consumers eat out at least once a week ‘50% of curry houses to close within 10 years’ HOSPITALITY Over 90% of Britain’s ‘Indian’ curry restaurants are Bangladeshi owned. MAY 2017 17


Stir it up magazine May 2017
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